When I see the phrase politically correct, I first focus on the word ‘political.’ Then I think of politics. Then I think of politicians. From there I think of things some politicians do or say in order to get elected. There is a dishonesty associated with it and a manipulation of the electorate.

I asked a group of pastors how they would define ‘politically correct.’ Only one of the 53 responses to my question came close to mine: “Whatever phrasing or actions that will gain you the most (or cost you the least) votes.” Many of the comments were similar to these:

  • To go along with what the masses say instead of what is the truth.
  • The willingness to cast truth aside in order to not offend someone.
  • Not speaking truth
  • Setting aside all personal convictions to appease others.
  • It is a thought control tactic used by the liberal left which on the surface has the express purpose of not offending the disadvantaged and those who oppose Christian values, but which the unexpressed undercurrent is to silence truth and erode religious freedoms.

On the other side there were definitions such as:

  • Being kind and speaking in love.
  • Using language that isn’t offensive.
  • Choosing vocabulary for referring to people that is not based on prejudice nor intended to hurt or demean.
  • Choosing alternate, often unfamiliar language or practice, in an attempt to minimize actual or perceived offense toward a particular group.
  • A term that only people of privilege use to describe with disdain those who think differently about the power of language than they do.

I found it interesting to trace the origins of the phrase ‘political correctness’ or ‘politically correct’. I thought of sharing with you the history of PC and how it has evolved in meaning over the years, but that would digress from my point. When you have the time Google it, I think you will be surprised.

My point is that many Christians today are accusing other Christians of being PC. This indictment is usually accompanied by an air of contempt and belligerence. The claim is that certain believers, churches, and entire denominations have caved in to social pressure and have knowingly walked away from the truth of scriptures in order to better fit in to the non-Christian culture. Are there PCers like that out there? Probably, but I don’t know any of them…and I know a lot of Christians and Pastors and churches.

What I see happening is that there is a growing group of Christians who are trying to walk out their faith as closely to the example of Jesus as they can. As they attempt this they are becoming kinder, more accepting, more tolerant, more loving. They want to avoid offending others as much as possible. They love God. They believe in the Bible. Theirs is a different kind of PC, not ‘politically correct’ but ‘people compassionate.’ Do they get it right in every area of doctrine and practice? Of course not, but neither do those who are on the other side. Nobody gets it completely right.

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Few would argue that the apostle Paul was not afraid to speak the truth, confront sin and doctrinal error. His letters are filled with examples. Recently while reading through I Corinthians I came across two passages that made me see how balanced Paul really was.

I Cor. 9:20 20 To the Jews I became as a Jew, so that I might win Jews; to those who are under the Law, as under the Law though not being myself under the Law, so that I might win those who are under the Law; 21 to those who are without law, as without law, though not being without the law of God but under the law of Christ, so that I might win those who are without law.  (NASB)

I Cor. 10:32 Give no offense either to Jews or to Greeks or to the church of God; 33 just as I also please all men in all things, not seeking my own profit but the profit of the many, so that they may be saved.. (NASB)

They say, “You can’t please everybody.” but is seems that Paul tried. Paul didn’t want to offend if he didn’t need to. Paul was trying to build bridges rather than walls in order that he might win people to Christ. I could imagine that if I said the same things Paul said in the above scriptures that some would accuse me of being too PC, a people-pleaser, that I’ve caved in to societal pressure.

I don’t want to call someone PC too flippantly, especially if my words accompanied by contempt and belligerence. I don’t want to accuse someone of being PC without talking to them and seeing their heart, their motives, their convictions. And if I happen to actually take the time to get to know the person I’m concerned about and end up not liking their motives, convictions and heart, if I still strongly disagree with them…I don’t want to attack or be offensive, I don’t want to be belligerent.

I think there is more PC out there among Christians than we imagine but it is not political correctness, it is people-compassion.

When I read the words of Jesus and the authors of the New Testament, I find myself challenged to evaluate my reactions to those who I disagree with. For example:

Because Jesus, in the ‘High Priestly Prayer’ of John 17, prayed three times to the Father that his followers “may be one”, I ask myself, “Are my words, attitudes and actions creating oneness or two-ness? By ‘two-ness’ I mean a division, my group versus their group.

One theme from the book of Hebrews is that Jesus is a different kind of priest than those under the old covenant. Did you know that the Latin word for ‘priest’ means ‘bridge-builder’?

Peter calls us a ‘royal priesthood’ (I Pet. 2:9), I must ask myself, “Are my words building bridges or building walls?

Three times Jesus told us to ‘love one another’ (Jn. 13:34, Jn. 15:12,17). Do my attitudes towards those I disagree with reflect love…or something less than love, or even contempt and judgment?

Paul added to Jesus’ reminder to ‘love’ by saying in I Cor. 13 that love is patient. I must ask myself if my words and actions and attitudes towards those I disagree with reflect patience or impatience? Do I rush to correct, judge, or label someone who is different than me?

Paul said in Gal. 5 that the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. I must ask myself if my words or actions or attitudes towards those I disagree with are filled with that type of fruit? I fear that sometimes I have fruit but it is rotten, worm-filled fruit.

Peter said (I Pet. 2: 17to show honor all people. Does my life reflect showing honor to those I disagree with?

Because Paul told Timothy, “The Lord’s bond-servant must not be quarrelsome, but be kind to all, able to teach, patient when wronged, with gentleness correcting those who are in opposition, if perhaps God may grant them repentance leading to the knowledge of the truth…” (II Tim. 2:24-25), I must ask myself if my words or actions or attitudes towards those I disagree with are quarrelsome in nature, unkind, impatient, lacking in gentleness?

YEAH, BUT…

There’s always a ‘YEAH BUT.’

Yeah, but what about orthodoxy?
Yeah, but what about heresy?
Yeah, but what about bringing correction?
Yeah, but what about loving the sinner but hating the sin?
Yeah, but what about defending the truth?
Yeah, but what about Jesus turning over the tables in the temple?
Yeah, but what about holiness?
Yeah, but what about obedience?
Yeah, but what about speaking the truth in love?
Yeah, but what about balance?

What about it?

I believe there is a place for all the ‘YEAH BUTS’ but I also believe that we’ve been giving too much of a place to them.

Believe me, if I choose to not correct others or act belligerently towards those I think are in error there will still be enough correction and belligerence out there to get the job done. The ‘YEAH BUTS’ are alive and well, they aren’t going anyplace. Those who feel an obligation to fight are alive and well, they aren’t going anyplace. I’m not worried about a lack of the ‘YEAH BUTS’, correction, or belligerence. I want to be part of something different.

In 2020 I decided to limit my reading to female authors, writers of color, and authors of people-groups other than my own. This was such a great experience even though I caught some heat from a few Christians who felt I should not even be reading certain books…I’ll leave it up to you to guess which books these were.

I’m certain I’ve missed a couple, but here they are and not in the order in which I read them. Let me know if you have read any of them or if you think I’m a heretic for having done so.

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Political Tribes: Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations by Chua, Amy

Angela Davis: An Autobiography

Does the Bible Condemn Gay People?: A Close Look at What Scripture Says About Homosexuality by Grant Andrews

The Shift: Surviving and Thriving after Moving from Conservative to Progressive Christianity by Colby Martin

Abolition Democracy: Beyond Empire, Prisons, and Torture by Angela Y. Davis

Soul Care in African American Practice by Barbara L. Peacock

The Bible, Christianity, & Homosexuality by Justin R. Cannon

Sermon on the Mount: A Beginner’s Guide to the Kingdom of Heaven by Amy-Jill Levine

The Martyrdom of Thomas Merton: An Investigation by Hugh Turley

Seeing Jesus in East Harlem: What Happens When Churches Show Up and Stay Put by José Humphreys

After Evangelicalism: The Path to a New Christianity by David P. Gushee

The Making of Asian America: A History by Erika Lee

I’m Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness by Austin Channing Brown

The Next Evangelicalism: Freeing the Church from Western Cultural Captivity by Soong-Chan Rah

Rescuing Jesus: How People of Color, Women, and Queer Christians are Reclaiming Evangelicalism by Deborah Jian Lee

“All the Real Indians Died Off”: And 20 Other Myths About Native Americans (Myths Made in America) by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Dina Gilio-Whitaker 

Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation by Kristin Kobes Du Mez

Native: Identity, Belonging, and Rediscovering God by Kaitlin B. Curtice

Becoming by Michelle Obama

How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi

Womanist Midrash: a reintroduction to the women of the Torah and the Throne. by Wilda C. Gagne

Does Jesus really love me? by Jeff Chu

Strength to love by Martin Luther King Jr.

And indigenous peoples history of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi

Failing is different than being a failure.

“John, you’re so good at trying.” – Moira Rose

To fail is the inevitable and reoccurring result of being human. There is an important difference between failing and being a failure. 

Thinking of oneself as a failure is the embracing of a false narrative that ignores or misses one’s true identity in God.

“I can’t do anything right.” = false narrative

“I’m so stupid.” = false narrative

“I screw up everything I set out to do.” = false narrative

“I’m a failure.” = false narrative

I have to push back against this false narrative in my life. I’ve failed in so many ways and so many times that it is easy for me to identify as a looser, poor excuse of a Christian, a failure. However, my friend Henri Nouwen, (Life of the Beloved) has helped me see my true identity as being “The Beloved of God.”

Do yourself a favor sometime. Get out a concordance, or find one online, and search for all the times the word “beloved” comes up. You will discover two things. First, Bible authors often referred to their readers as “beloved.” And, Bible authors often reminded their readers that they were the beloved of God.

You may have failed as a parent, but you are the beloved of God.

You may have failed as a wife or husband, but you are the beloved of God.

You may have failed in some area of addiction, but you are the beloved of God.

You may be a pastor and have failed to grow your church, despite having tried all the things the “experts” have told you, but you are the beloved of God.

You may have failed in developing a consistent devotional life, but you are the beloved of God.

You may have failed at imitating Jesus to the people around you, but you are the beloved of God.

Stop the false narrative. You are not a failure, you are the beloved of God. And even if you fail at stopping the false narrative, you are still the beloved of God.

TOO MUCH, TOO LITTLE
by dave jacobs
 
 
There is too much violence.
There is too little peace.
 
There is too much argument.
There is too little communication.
 
There are too many strong opinions.
There is too little openness.
 
There is too much hate.
There is too little love.
 
There is too much talking.
There is too little listening.
 
There is too much pride.
There is too little humility.
 
There’s too much noise.
There is too little quiet.
 
There are too many sides.
There is too little unity.
 
There is too much black and white.
There is too little gray.
 
There is too much rejection.
There is too little acceptance.
 
There is too much Bible-quoting.
There is too little Bible-living.
 
There is too much bias.
There is too little objectivity.
 
There is too much fear.
There is too little faith.
 
There is too much suspicion.
There is too little proof.
 
There is too much judgment.
There is too little grace.
 
There is too much Bible-knowledge.
There is too little Jesus-imitating.
 
There is too much preying.
There is too little praying.
 
There is too much turbulence.
There is too little still water.

Rather than Simon & Garfunkel…imagine Jesus singing this over you today.

When you’re weary, feeling small.
When tears are in your eyes, I will dry them all.
I’m on your side, oh, when times get rough.
And friends just can’t be found
Like a bridge over troubled water
I will lay me down.
Like a bridge over troubled water
I will lay me down.

When you’re down and out
When you’re on the street.
When evening falls so hard
I will comfort you.
I’ll take your part, oh, when darkness comes.
And pain is all around
Like a bridge over troubled water
I will lay me down.
Like a bridge over troubled water
I will lay me down.

Sail on silver girl
Sail on by.
Your time has come to shine
All your dreams are on their way.
See how they shine
Oh, if you need a friend.
I’m sailing right behind
Like a bridge over troubled water
I will ease your mind.
Like a bridge over troubled water
I will ease your mind.

Position Paper

I’ve written a brief position paper entitled: ‘A case for full inclusion of gay Christians in the life and ministry of the local church, written for normal people.’

If you’d like a copy email me at: scpcoaching@gmail.com

More information:

I didn’t write this for pastors or Bible scholars. If you are hoping for a lot of footnotes, quotes, and intellectual depth, you will be sorely disappointed.
I have written this for normal people. This is for parents who just had a son or daughter come out to them and they are trying to figure out a way forward. If you have been hiding your same-sex or both-sex attraction for years, fearing that your parents, Christian friends, or church will reject you, this is for you. If you grew up in a traditional, conservative church that told you the Bible clearly condemns the ‘gay lifestyle’, and aren’t sure where you stand on this important issue, this is for you. If you have been looking for someone safe to dialogue with about this subject, this is for you. If you have been told that no Bible-believing Christian can be supportive of same-sex marriage or full acceptance of gay Christians in the church, I wrote this simple paper to show you that Bible-believing, Jesus-loving Christians can indeed believe this, and how do I know? Because I am one, and I’m not the only one.

About 15 years ago I began to collect quotes from books I had been reading that were particularly meaningful to me. I now have two volumes of such quotes. I call them, “My black books of quotes.“ because they are handwritten in…well, black books. One day I hope to publish these quotes as a special gift that I give to people who are special to me. 

You can tell a lot about a person by the quotes they pass on. And you will, no doubt, learn some things about where I am coming from and what is important to me based on my quotes. 

My plan right now is to post 8 to 10 special quotes each week that seem pertinent to the times in which we are living. These are quotes for chaotic times. I suggest that you read them slowly and prayerfully and see which one speaks to you the most and listen for the voice of the Spirit asking you what next steps you might take in response.

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When a man is getting better he understands more and more clearly the evil that is still left in him. (CS Lewis)

If the horse is dead by all means dismount. (Unknown)

There grows in me and immense dissatisfaction with all that is merely passively excepted as truth, without struggle without examination. (Thomas Merton)

No man can afford to be passive and to restrict his thinking to a new rehearsal, in his own mind, of what is being repeated all around him. (Thomas Merton)

Christianity is full of specialists and authorities on what is wrong with different camps of Christians. Wouldn’t it be a little simpler and more honest to stop and look at what is right with different views of Christianity? We don’t have to broadcast indifferentism all over the place. We don’t have to compromise on anything. (Thomas Merton)

I know you want to see the road ahead rather than trusting God. If you continue this way, the road will get longer and your spiritual progress will slow down. (Francois Fenelon)

About 15 years ago I began to collect quotes from books I had been reading that were particularly meaningful to me. I now have two volumes of such quotes. I call them, “My black books of quotes.“ because they are handwritten in…well, black books. One day I hope to publish these quotes as a special gift that I give to people who are special to me. 

You can tell a lot about a person by the quotes they pass on. And you will, no doubt, learn some things about where I am coming from and what is important to me based on my quotes. 

My plan right now is to post 8 to 10 special quotes each week that seem pertinent to the times in which we are living. These are quotes for chaotic times. I suggest that you read them slowly and prayerfully and see which one speaks to you the most and listen for the voice of the Spirit asking you what next steps you might take in response.

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Burn out is giving without receiving. (Henri Nouwen)

There is always a night shift and sooner or later we are put on it. (Evelyn Underhill)

Sometimes our position seems to be that of tools, taken up when wanted, used in ways we had not expected for an object on which our opinion is not asked, and then laid down. (Evelyn Underhill)

The more afraid we are, the harder waiting becomes. (Henri Nouwen)

I’ve come to realize the futility of criticism, even true and just. (Thomas Merton)

We must learn to express our ideas calmly and with detachment. (Thomas Merton)

It is hard for us to realize that much of what we pursue in life has little ultimate meaning. (Rob Moll)

You don’t fully understand something until you can explain it in a simple way. (AlbertEinstein)

Some books are to be tasted, others are to be swallowed, and some few are to be chewed and digested. (Francis Bacon)

Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend. Inside a dog it’s too dark to read. (Groucho Marx)

About 15 years ago I began to collect quotes from books I had been reading that were particularly meaningful to me. I now have two volumes of such quotes. I call them, “My black books of quotes.“ because they are handwritten in…well, black books. One day I hope to publish these quotes as a special gift that I give to people who are special to me.

You can tell a lot about a person by the quotes they pass on. And you will, no doubt, learn some things about where I am coming from and what is important to me based on my quotes.

My plan right now is to post 8 to 10 special quotes each week that seem pertinent to the times in which we are living. These are quotes for chaotic times. I suggest that you read them slowly and prayerfully and see which one speaks to you the most and listen for the voice of the Spirit asking you what next steps you might take in response.

****

The older I grow, the more I listen to people who don’t talk much. (Germaine Glien)

Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply. They are either speaking or preparing to speak. (Steven Covey)

Life for too many leaders is a blur of activity and planning, with sparse occasions for reflection, replenishing, rejoicing, and responding to the relationship the Lord is inviting them to experience and enjoy with him. The urgent crowds out the essential. Doing ignores being. Developing skills becomes more important than shaping character. (Transformational Coaching)

I think the chief reason why we have so little joy is that we take ourselves too seriously. (Thomas Merton)

Speaking of the many distractions we face when attempting to pray, Henry Nouwen said, “Our inner life often looks like a banana tree full of jumping monkeys.“

We can gradually step beyond our need to judge others and our inclination to evaluate everybody and everything. (Henri Nouwen)

Imagine your having no need at all to judge anybody. Imagine your having no desire to decide whether someone is a good or bad person. Imagine your being completely free from the feeling that you have to make up your mind about the morality of someone’s behavior. Imagine that you could say, “I am judging no one!“ Imagine…wouldn’t that be true inner freedom? (Henry Nouwen)

The desert fathers believed that simply not speaking is a very important practice. Too often our words are superfluous, inauthentic, and shallow. It is a good discipline to wonder in each new situation if people would be better served by our silence then by our words. (Henry Nouwen)

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